Chlorophyllin

Chlorophyll is the green photosynthetic pigment present in chloroplasts which provides the energy necessary for photosynthesis. The intense green color of chlorophyll is due to its strong absorbencies in the red and blue regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, and because of these absorbencies the light it reflects and transmits appears green. It is capable of channeling the energy of sunlight into chemical energy through the process of photosynthesis. In this process the energy absorbed by chlorophyll transforms carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and oxygen.

Chlorophyll is the substance responsible for the green color in plants that accomplishes photosynthesis. Chlorophyll has been used traditionally to improve bad breath, as well as to reduce the odors of urine, feces, and infected wounds. Chlorophyll has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and wound-healing properties.

Chlorophyll is a green compound found in leaves and green stems of plants. Initially, it was assumed that chlorophyll was a single compound but in 1864 Stokes showed by spectroscopy that chlorophyll was a mixture. If dried leaves are powdered and digested with ethanol, after concentration of the solvent, 'crystalline' chlorophyll is obtained, but if ether or aqueous acetone is used instead of ethanol, the product is 'amorphous' chlorophyll. In plants chlorophyll is associated with specific proteins, for example, chlorophyll-a binding proteins are referred to as CP I, CP 47 and CP 43. With improving biochemical techniques for use on the membrane systems there has been an ever increasing success in the isolation and characterisation of these proteins.

Chlorophyll is one of the most important chelates in nature. It is capable of channelling the energy of sunlight into chemical energy through the process of photosynthesis. In photosynthesis, the energy absorbed by chlorophyll transforms carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and oxygen. Chlorophyll is vital for photosynthesis by destarching a variegated plant's leaves and exposing it to light for several hours. Variegated plant leaves have green areas which contain chlorophyll and white areas that have none. When tested with iodine solution a colour change showing starch present is only evident in regions of the plant that were green and therefore contained chlorophyll. This shows that photosynthesis does not occur in areas where chlorophyll is absent, and therefore supports the theory that the presence of chlorophyll is a requirement for photosynthesis to take place.

Two types of chlorophyll are found in plants and the green algae. Chlorophyll a is the pigment that participates directly in the light requiring reactions of photosynthesis. Chlorophyll b differs from chlorophyll a only in one of the functional groups bonded to the porphyrin (a -CHO group in place of a -CH3 group). It is an accessory pigment and acts indirectly in photosynthesis by transferring the light it absorbs to chlorophyll a. Alternating single and double bonds, known as conjugated bonds, such as those in the porphyrin ring of chlorophylls, are common among pigments, and are responsible for the absorption of visible light by these substances. Both chlorophylls a and b primarily absorb red and blue light, the colors most effective in photosynthesis. They reflect or transmit green light, which is why leaves appear green. The ratio of chlorophyll a to chlorophyll b in the chloroplast is 3:1. Green chlorophyll molecules on the membranes of the vesicle stacks capture light energy to produce food by photosynthesis. Group of pigments including chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b, the green pigments present in chloroplasts in most plants it is responsible for the absorption of light energy during photosynthesis. The pigment absorbs the red and blue-violet parts of sunlight but reflects the green, thus giving plants their characteristic colour. Other chlorophylls include chlorophyll c and chlorophyll d.

Chlorophyll is essentially two parts: a substituted porphyrin ring and phytol (the long carbon chain). The porphyrin ring is an excellent chelating ligand, with the four nitrogen atoms binding strongly to a co-ordinated metal atom in a square planar arrangement.

Chlorophyll is found within chloroplasts, present in large numbers in leaves. Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) and other photosynthetic bacteria also have chlorophyll, though of a slightly different type. Chlorophyll is similar in structure to haemoglobin, but with magnesium instead of iron as the reactive part of the molecule. Because it contains magnesium, chlorophyll is considered a plant nutrient. Magnesium can often be a part of a mixture of minerals used as a fertilizer.

We supply following chlorophyll derivatives.

Chlorophyll copper
Applications: Be possessed of medicinal function for sterilize and disinfammation etc. It is find additive and coloring matter of Essential Balm of the Rind oil medicinal.

Sodium copper Chlorophylline
Applications: Sodium copper chlorophylline is used for the manufacture of
medicine or used as additives of the food.

Sodium iron Chlorophylline
Applications: Sodium copper chlorophylline is used for the manufacture of
medicine or used as additives of the food.

Zincum copper Chlorophylline
Applications: Sodium copper chlorophylline is used for the manufacture of
medicine or used as additives of the food.

Chlorophyll Paste
Applications: Chlorophyll is used for the manufacture of phytol an chlorophyllines derivatives, such as sodium copper chlorophylline. Sodium iron chlorophylline etc…

Natural phytol
Applications:Phytol is used for the manufacture of Vitamin E and Vitamin K etc…

Sodium Chlorophyllin
Applications: Sodium copper chlorophylline is used for the manufacture of
medicine or used as additives of the food.

Sodium Magnesium Chlorophyllin
Applications: Sodium copper chlorophylline is used for the manufacture of
medicine or used as additives of the food.

Potassium Copper Chlorophyllin
Applications: Sodium copper chlorophylline is used for the manufacture of
medicine or used as additives of the food.