Gallic Acid

Gallic acid is colorless crystalline organic acid found in gallnuts, sumach, tea leaves, oak bark, and many other plants, both in its free state and as part of the tannin molecule. Since gallic acid has hydroxyl groups and a carboxylic acid group in the same molecule, two molecules of it can react with one another to form an ester, digallic acid. Gallic acid is obtained by the hydrolysis of tannic acid with sulfuric acid. When heated above 220, gallic acid loses carbon dioxide to form pyrogallol, or 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene, C 6 H 3 (OH) 3 , which is used in the production of azo dyes and photographic developers and in laboratories for absorbing oxygen.

Uses: Widely used in organic synthesis, pharmaceutical, ink making, dyestuff, national defence, chemical, food and light industries.

Synonyms: 3,4,5-Trihydroxybenzoic Acid
Molecular Formula: C6H2(OH)3H-H2O
CAS No.: 5995-86-8
Molecular Weight: 188.13
Specification: Conforms to USP, JIS 1st grade, HGB5309-85 standards.

 

Monohydrate

Anhydrous

Water solubility test, %

Clear

Clear

Content, %

99.0 min

99.0 min

Loss of drying, %

10.0 max

0.5 max

Residue on ignition, %

0.01 max

0.01 max

Sulfate, %

0.02 max

0.02 max

Chloride, %

Pass test

Pass test

Tannic acid test, %

0.0001 max

0.0001 max

Cloud point, %

0.0002 max

0.0002 max

Heavy Metals, PPM

10 max

10 max

Packing: In plastic woven bag or paper bag or fibre drums with lining plastic bag, each 25kg net.