Sodium Monofluorophosphate

Sodium monofluorophosphate is used in toothpastes to protect tooth enamel from attack by bacteria (cavities, also known as caries). The active part of the molecule is the fluoride ion, which is why two other fluorine containing compounds, sodium fluoride, and stannous fluoride are also used. Like stannous fluoride, sodium monofluorophosphate can be used with abrasives that contain calcium, which prevents sodium fluoride from being effective. Fluorides work in two ways. They reduce the ability of bacteria to make acids, and they remineralize the areas of the tooth that have been attacked by acids from bacteria.

Sodium monofluorophosphate (SMFP), easy soluble in water, excellent stability, effective anti-dental-caries effect, low toxicity, no side effect and corrosive action; PH is near to neutrality, excellent compatibility, outstanding bactericidal action: 0.01%-0.1% aqueous solution can inhibit the growth and propagation of mould fungus; 1% aqueous solution has apparent inhibition action on aspergillus niger, staphylococcus aureus, salmonella typhosa, pseudomonas aeruginosa, etc.; white powder or white crystal. Sodium monofluorophosphate is a form of fluoride regularly used in toothpaste and also in some medications for the treatment of osteoporosis. Sodium monofluorophosphate is used in toothpastes to protect tooth enamel from attack by bacteria (cavities, also known as caries). It was developed to avoid infinging on the Crest patent for stannous fluoride. The usual content in toothpaste is 0.76% and in drinking water is 1.0mg/L. Using such toothpaste and drinking water, dental caries may reduce 17%-38%.

Chemical Formula: Na2PO3F
CAS Number: 7631-97-2