Titanium Dioxide

Titanium dioxide, also known as titania is the naturally occurring oxide of titanium, chemical formula TiO2. Pure titanium dioxide does not occur in nature but is derived from ilmenite or leuxocene ores. It is also readily mined in one of the purest forms, rutile beach sand.

An important use of titanium dioxide is in powder form as a pigment for providing whiteness and opacity to such products such as paints and coatings but also plastics, paper, inks, food and cosmetics, including most toothpastes. Titanium dioxide is by far the most widely used white pigment, it is very white and has a very high refractive index (n=2.4) — only surpassed by diamond. The high refractive index and bright white colour of titanium dioxide make it an effective opacifier for pigments, and (when deposited as a thin film), as a reflective optical coating for dielectric mirrors. One of its other major advantages is its resistance to discoloration under UV light. With titanium dioxide having the highest refractive index of all the colorless substances known, it provides the best light scattering ability as well as the best hiding power.

Titanium dioxide has good dispersion and optical features which makes it excellent for paints. Titanium dioxide is the most important white pigment produced commercially. This might be due to the fact that the metal source is a very abundant element on earth. Unfortunately, it is not as cheap as you would think, or companies using it would like.

The most important function of titanium dioxide however is in powder form as a pigment for providing whiteness and opacity to such products such as paints and coatings (including glazes and enamels), plastics, paper, inks, fibres and food and cosmetics. Titanium dioxide is by far the most widely used white pigment. Titanium dioxide is very white and has a very high refractive index – surpassed only by diamond. The refractive index determines the opacity that the material confers to the matrix in which the pigment is housed. Hence, with its high refractive index, relatively low levels of titania pigment are required to achieve a white opaque coating.

The high refractive index and bright white colour of titanium dioxide make it an effective opacifier for pigments. The material is used as an opacifier in glass and porcelain enamels, cosmetics, sunscreens, paper, and paints. One of the major advantages of the material for exposed applications is its resistance to discoloration under UV light.Titanium dioxide acts as a photosensitiser for photovoltaic cells, and when used as an electrode coating in photoelectrolysis cells can enhance the efficiency of electrolytic splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. Even in mildly reducing atmospheres titania tends to lose oxygen and become sub stoichiometric. In this form the material becomes a semiconductor and the electrical resistivity of the material can be correlated to the oxygen content of the atmosphere to which it is exposed. Hence titania can be used to sense the amount of oxygen (or reducing species) present in an atmosphere. The photocatalytic activity of titania results in thin coatings of the material exhibiting self cleaning and disinfecting properties under exposure to UV radiation. These properties make the material a candidate for applications such as medical devices, food preparation surfaces, air conditioning filters, and sanitaryware surfaces.